June 10, 2014

Kicsi: You Were a Great Dog

Kicsi


Last weekend I said good-bye to a great friend who was part of my family for 11 years.

The moment I pulled up in the driveway, she galloped around the perimeter of our yard, barking her head off to show what an excellent protector she was.

When I took my coffee out on the deck, she came and sat with me and quietly enjoyed the day with me.

When our Yorkie got lost in the forest, Kicsi tracked her and found her.

When it got difficult for her to go up the stairs, she tried anyway. And when she couldn't do it on her own, she still tried, even though she ended up needing to be carried.

She was always here. Physically and emotionally. No matter what, she always made her very best effort. She wasn't just a good dog, she was a great dog. And she's deeply missed.

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June 04, 2014

How to Find Straight Quotes and Apostrophes in Word 2010

Did you ever wish you could hunt down those pesky straight quotation marks and apostrophes in a Word document without using AutoFormat (whose "smart quotes" feature sometimes curls the marks the wrong direction)?

Did you try looking for them using Unicode values, only to discover the Find tool in Word 2010 doesn't recognize Unicode? Frustrating, right?

But don't worry, you can find straight quotes and apostrophes in Word 2010 if you use ASCII codes in the "Find what" field in the Find dialog box. It works in the Navigation Pane, too.

Here's how to find the ASCII codes:
  1. Open the Insert Symbol dialog box. Select the symbol you want to find (in the picture below, you can see that I've selected the straight apostrophe, which is in my list of recently used symbols).
  2. In the "from" box, choose "ASCII (decimal)"; this is where the right-hand red arrow is pointing.
  3. In the "Character code" you'll see a code; this is where the left-hand arrow is pointing.
  4. In either the Navigation Pane or the Find dialog box, type a caret (this is a caret: ^). Then type the ASCII code for your character.
For example, to find straight apostrophes in Word, you'd type: ^39

(Period omitted from the previous sentence for clarity.)

Yes, it's as quick and easy as that! You use ^34 to find straight double quotes.



Additional references:
Word Banter forum post on finding unicode/ASCII characters in Word
Graham Mayor on using wildcards in Word (not necessary to find straight apostrophes/quotes but fascinating nonetheless)
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Happy reading! :)

June 01, 2014

Is Facebook Underreporting Reach?

Is it possible Facebook is underreporting the number of people who see your posts? Or do you think this screenshot is an anomaly?

FYI, I checked half an hour after the comment was made, and it still said nobody had seen the post.


"Weird or what?"— William Shatner

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Legal Stuff

Susan is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program and the Amazon.com.ca, Inc. Associates Program, affiliate advertising programs designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com and Amazon.ca.

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